Over the last few months, Mini has presented countless new models: electric and combustion three-doors, five-doors and the Aceman. There's also the Countryman, based on the BMW X1, but that's not what we're talking about here. Instead, we're talking about all the new models that are four metres long or less. Presumed new models, as you can see on closer inspection.

How did we get here? Well, first there was the new five-door Mini, which is strikingly similar to its predecessor and then we recently happened to be at BMW World in Munich. There was a new three-door Mini with an internal combustion engine with hinged door handles, however, we remembered that the electric model had folding handles. So, we started to do some research.

Three-door electric Mini (2024, J01)

Let's start with the new three-door electric Mini. Officially available in Cooper E (184 PS, range of around 186 miles) and Cooper SE (218 PS, range of around 249 miles). Known internally as the J01, it measures 3,858 mm in length, 1,756 mm in width and has a wheelbase of 2,526 mm.

Mini Cooper SE (2024)

Mini Cooper SE (2024)

The J01 is a joint development with Great Wall Motors (GWM). It is technically related to the Ora 03. A closer look reveals a moulding on the bottom of the doors, which is not the case with the three-door petrol-engined version. There are also the aforementioned folding door handles and a 'small' bonnet at the front, which doesn't lift all the way up like the classic BMW Mini bonnet.

Mini 3-door thermal (2024, F66)

On the other hand, the three-door petrol Mini is 'just' an evolution of the previous model, even if its appearance has been strongly adapted from the U01. This is reflected in the internal code F66, the previous model being the F56.

Mini Cooper S (2024)

Mini Cooper S (2024)

Let's look at the dimensions: 3,876 mm long, slightly longer than the U01, but slightly narrower at 1,744 mm wide. The wheelbase of 2,495 mm matches that of its predecessor, the F56. At the front, the F66 is distinguished from its electric counterpart by a different grille, and the headlamps are also slightly different. The large 'clamshell' bonnet is clearly visible and, when opened, reveals almost the entire front of the vehicle.

Mini Cooper S (2024)

Mini Cooper S (2024)

Mini Cooper SE (2024)

Mini Cooper SE (2024)

Only the rear is adapted to the U01, as is the interior with the large circular OLED 'pizza' screen. And then there are the hinged-shaped door handles mentioned at the start.

The engines are pretty much a redesign too: 156 PS three-cylinder BMW B38 for the Cooper C, 204 PS four-cylinder B48 for the Cooper S. A John Cooper Works with as yet unknown power will follow, as will a 'new' Mini Cabriolet of similar design.

Mini 5-door thermal (2024, F65)

Mini is continuing in a similar vein with its 'new' five-door. At 4,036 mm long, 1,744 mm wide and 1,464 mm high, the body dimensions are almost identical to those of its predecessor, the F55, and the hoop door handles remain.

Mini Cooper 5-Türer (2024)

Mini Cooper 5 portes (2024)

The petrol engines match those of the three-door F66, i.e. Cooper C and Cooper S.

Mini Aceman (J05)

If you're wondering where the electric version of the five-door is, it wasn't on the previous model. But there is now an electric car with more doors, the Aceman. Known internally as the J05, it too uses the GWM platform.

Mini Aceman SE (2024)

Mini Aceman SE (2024)

Length: 4,070 mm, width 1,750 mm, wheelbase 2,606 mm. That's more than the J01, but there's no difference in terms of propulsion or range. Visually, the Aceman looks more like an SUV - door handles included. As yet, there are no plans to equip the Aceman with a combustion engine.

Gallery: Mini Aceman SE (2024)