Once upon a time, V12 engines were symbols of power and nobility, reserved for the cars you dreamed about as a child and displayed on your bedroom wall, but only as an adult to leave the honour of owning and driving them to the lucky few. Nowadays, they're fading away into extinction, but we still can't do without them, especially around Maranello and Sant'Agata Bolognese.

Indeed, in these regions, the past always comes back, even if it evolves from time to time. Such is the case with the Ferrari 12Cilindri, the latest representative of the Cavallino V12 dynasty, which has rekindled the rivalry with the Bolognese Toro, which finds in the Lamborghini Revuelto its peak in terms of performance and power. Supercars so similar, yet so different, that today we pit them against each other in this new challenge.

The exterior

A long, long bonnet, ending in that dark front bumper that hearkens back to the past and to the 356 GTB of 1967. For Ferrari, history is a springboard for the future. Such is the case with the 12Cilindri, a muscular and elegant two-seater saloon, sinuous and efficient in guiding the air where it needs to go so as not to hinder the performance of the V12. It is both classic and innovative, especially at the rear, with a rear window that develops in a delta shape, almost as if to indicate the front, bouncing the gaze all over the bodywork.

<p>Ferrari 12Cilindri</p>

Ferrari 12Cilindri

Even at Sant'Agata, heritage plays a fundamental role in defining the lines of the bodywork, maintaining references to the style created by Marcello Gandini and which evolved over time towards the Lamborghini Revuelto, made up of sharp edges and surfaces and "Y" patterns (starting from the headlights) that run from the nose to the tail. A Corsican nose, because the V12 - as tradition dictates - is behind the cockpit and doesn't want to hide. There are no covers to hide it as it remains in full view, ready to make its voice heard. Beyond the styling, the big difference with the Ferrari 12Cilindri lies in the aerodynamics which, on the Toro supercar, feature an active spoiler at the rear.

<p>Lamborghini Revuelto</p>

Lamborghini Revuelto

Model Length Width Height Wheelbase Weight
Ferrari 12Cilindri 4.73 metres 2.17 metres 1.29 metres 2.7 metres 1,560 kg
Lamborghini Revuelto 4.94 metres 2.26 metres 1.16 metres 2.77 metres 1,772 kg

Interior

Elegance and sportiness go hand in hand in the interior of the Ferrari 12Cilindri, inspired by the Roma in the layout of the dashboard: 15.5-inch digital instrumentation, 10.25-inch central screen - in the lowered position - and 8.8-inch screen positioned in front of the passenger. The steering wheel features a number of haptic touch buttons and the emblematic red button on the right to control the various driving modes. Plus leather, exposed carbon and much more. Naturally, the doors of the Ferrari Tailor Made department are open to all customers to personalise their 12Cilindri to the maximum.

Ferrari 12Cilindri, interior

Ferrari 12Cilindri, interior

The interior of the Lamborghini Revuelto is no less impressive in terms of the number of screens and retains some elements present on the Aventador, such as the aviation-style ignition button, hidden under a red cover that has to be lifted. The differences with the Maranello rival are there, but the philosophy is the same: focus on the driver and his needs. One detail - which is not a detail - is the steering wheel paddles. Fixed in size and protected from distractions, they are always within easy reach. Here, too, the possibilities for personalisation are almost infinite - just call the Lamborghini Ad Personam department.

Lamborghini Revuelto, interior

Lamborghini Revuelto, interior

The engines

Here we go. Right from its name, the Ferrari 12Cilindri reveals the presence of the V12 - the 6.5-litre evolution of the F140 generation born with the Enzo - under the bonnet (or rather the bonnets). A naturally-aspirated unit, in keeping with tradition, capable of scaling the heights of power to reach 830 PS and 678 Nm of torque. Perhaps unthinkable levels for an engine without a turbocharger. The limit is set at 9,500 rpm. An unattainable Everest in an age dominated by turbos. It is connected to the rear wheels - and only to them - by an 8-speed dual-clutch gearbox, revised to be even faster and more precise. The top speed is in excess of 211 mph and the 0 to 62 mph is achieved in 2.9 seconds.

<p>Ferrari 12Cilindri</p>

Ferrari 12Cilindri

On the Lamborghini Revuelto, the strictly aspirated V12 takes a historic leap forward in the company's evolution as it is accompanied by three electric motors, one at the rear and two at the front. Four-wheel-drive electrification, with the option of driving in electric mode thanks to the 3.8 kWh battery that can be recharged on site. Total power is 1,015 PS, 825 of which comes from the V12, capable of reaching 9,250 rpm.

The other big change compared to the Aventador is the presence of the 8-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox, which replaces the previous 7-speed robotised gearbox. According to the raw figures, the top speed is 217 mph and the 0-62 mph time is 2.5 seconds.

<p>Lamborghini Revuelto</p>

Lamborghini Revuelto

Model Engine Performance
Ferrari 12Cilindri V12 6.5 naturally-aspirated 830 PS - 678 Nm Maximum speed: > 211 mph
0-62 mph: 2.9 seconds
Lamborghini Revuelto V12 6.5 naturally aspirated + 3 electric
1,015 PS - 725 Nm
Top speed: > 217 mph
0-62 mph: 2.5 seconds

Price

Speaking of supercars, if you have to ask the price, it's because you can't afford them. Joking aside, prices around Maranello and Sant'Agata have never been cheap. The Ferrari 12Cilindri and Lamborghini Revuelto are no exception.

The former starts at €395,000 (approx. £340,000). If you wish, you can also get a Spider version. In that case, the cheque to be drawn is at least €435,000 (£370,000). If you want to go down the customisation route, you can go up, up and up.

The Lamborghini Revuelto goes even higher, with an offer starting at around €520,000 (£440,000). Once again, the possibilities for personalisation are endless, and the price tag can reach new heights.