The Chinese EV industry is booming. Now Skyworth – the automotive subsidiary of Skywell, an electronics company from China – wants to get in on the game with the new Skyhome, a sleek-looking saloon that will go into production next year.

Drawing inspiration from traditional Chinese architectural aesthetics, the EV boasts a design ethos reminiscent of classical pavilions, setting it apart from the conventional EV crowd – or at least that's what the company says in an official press release. One of the highlights is the vehicle's cornice wings, which serve the functional purpose of sliding backward during driving to reduce wind resistance by an impressive three percent. In adverse weather or emergency situations, they tilt up, increasing resistance by five percent for enhanced control.

Skyworth Skyhome

The Skyhome isn't just about aesthetics, though. The firm responsible for its development says the car has something it calls the Ten Smart Butlers, which is a technology based on AI algorithms, providing a suite of functions ranging from entrepreneurial guidance to emotional support. Yes, you read that part right.

The vehicle's intelligent voice capabilities go beyond the ordinary, boasting the ability to "listen, speak, see, recognise, understand, and think," facilitated by multi-intent voice interaction technology. Even more impressively, the system also incorporates an intelligent non-contact vital signs monitoring system, which is supposed to recognise health risks in very early stages. Again, we are not kidding.

Skyworth Skyhome
Skyworth Skyhome

Last but not least, there's also a giant TV for the rear passengers that retracts from the ceiling. We don't know how big it is but from the photos, it looks even bigger than the new BMW 7 Series' 31.1-inch screen at the back.

Skyworth also invested heavily into suspension technology, claiming the new electric saloon has one of the most advanced air suspensions in the industry. It features a double-wishbone front setup, rear aluminium alloy five-link layout, and a perfectly balanced front and rear axle load ratio of 50:50. Also, the overall chassis design with an integrated battery pack, which also acts as the body floor, apparently reduces the number of parts by 127 compared to a conventional EV. The automaker also promises a weight reduction of 24 percent compared to a more conventional design.

There's no official information about the powertrain yet.

Gallery: Skyworth Skyhome