Sorry, fans of the Top Gear TV show, but the programme is done "for the foreseeable future," according to a statement from the BBC. The cancellation comes amid the network reaching a settlement with host Freddie Flintoff after a crash resulting in injuries to him last year.

"We know resting the show will be disappointing news for fans, but it is the right thing to do," the BBC said in its statement. "All other Top Gear activity remains unaffected by this hiatus, including international formats, digital, magazines, and licensing."

Using terms like "resting the show" and "for the foreseeable future" indicates that the Top Gear TV show is not dead forever. However, it also suggests the current format with hosts Chris Harris, Paddy McGuinness, and Flintoff will likely not return.

Flintoff's crash happened at the Top Gear test track at Dunsfold Aerodrome in December 2022. A source told Britain's The Sun: "He was driving on the track as normal. He wasn't going at high speeds - it was just an accident that could happen to anyone." However, medical personnel had to airlift him to a hospital. Subsequent photos showed him with a scar on his face.

The BBC reached a settlement with Flintoff that was allegedly worth £9 million. The network also launched a third-party investigation into the show's safety. The analysis "was concluded in March of this year and is not being published, which we have always made clear," the BBC said.

Top Gear, which first premiered in 1977, has had many hosts and iterations over the years. In 2002, a revised, more personality-driven version premiered with Jeremy Clarkson and Richard Hammond. James May joined the team in 2003. They created the stunt- and comedy-focused programme that people are most familiar with today.