Alpina has been selling modified versions of existing BMW models for decades with great success in certain markets. The German firm usually builds alternatives to BMW’s own performance cars with a touch of exclusivity and an under-the-radar appearance. This has been a successful formula for the Buchloe-based company but a change in the strategy is probably coming around the middle of the decade. It might bring a discontinued model back on the assembly line, though.

BMW Blog has a new article detailing Alpina’s new role as part of the BMW Group. The Munich automaker is set to take control over Alpina on 1 January 2026, and we are yet to learn more about where the performance division will sit in BMW’s hierarchy. One thing that seems very possible at this point, however, is the return of the B7 as the firm’s flagship saloon.

Gallery: 202 Alpina B7 first drive

The B7 was discontinued in September last year when the last example rolled off the assembly line coinciding with the start of production of the G70 generation BMW 7 Series. At the time, Alpina said “the era of the BMW Alpina B7 is coming to an end in the Alpina automobile manufactory,” hinting that there would be no successor to the performance 7er. However, BMW Blog says the B7 could return with the facelift of the new 7 Series, which should probably debut around the time BMW gets control of Alpina.

The final Alpina B7 had a 4.4-litre twin-turbo V8 engine under the bonnet with 600 bhp. Compared to the stock unit, Alpina’s motor had new twin-scroll turbochargers with larger inlet and outer dimensions and new compressors, different Mahle pistons, NGK spark plugs, an upgraded air-to-water intercooler, a revised cooling system, and additional external water and oil coolers. At the time of its launch, it was the fastest saloon in the world with a top speed of 205 miles per hour.

As for BMW’s strategy regarding Alpina after the middle of the decade, BMW Blog reports that the automaker is considering launching a new Luxury Class of vehicles with Alpina taking care of its development, marketing, and distribution. Initially, these vehicles won’t be fully electric as Alpina’s customer base reportedly prefers petrol and diesel power.