The Revuelto is not the first Lamborghini with a plug-in hybrid powertrain, but it is the first you can buy since the 2014 Asterion was a concept. It's a superior product in the sense it has a bigger V12 instead of the Huracan's V10. We had the chance to sample the newly developed naturally aspirated 6.5-litre engine at the Vallelunga circuit and find out how it works in conjunction with the three electric motors, two of which are driving the front wheels.

The Aventador's seven-speed automated manual was considered its Achilles' heel, but the Independent Shifting Rod (ISR) has now made way for a new eight-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission. Motor1.com Senior Editor Brett Evans experienced the all-new package at the Italian track north of Rome and used the shift paddles for nearly instant gear changes. Despite its sheer size and weight, the Revuelto felt nimble in the corners and addictively quick on the straights.

Lamborghini Revuelto

Sant'Agata Bolognese's new flagship offers a combined 1,001 bhp that must move a large supercar measuring 4,945 millimetres (194.7 inches) and weighing 1,772 kilograms (3,906 pounds) before adding fluids. While we can’t imagine many owners will ever take the Revuelto to a track day, the potent PHEV is more than able to deliver the thrill you’d expect from a V12 car. Despite having a hugely intricate powertrain, all the components work harmoniously to deliver a natural operation without any hiccups.

Even though the first reviews are just coming out, Lamborghini has said it already has enough orders to keep busy well into 2025. The exotic Italian marque part of the Volkswagen Group will say fuel consumption and emissions are significantly down compared to any other Lambo before it, but people are buying this car for other reasons. It still has a turbo-less V12, a much-improved transmission, and the instant response of electric motors – all of which are tightly packaged in a modernised wedge shape.