The Tesla Model S Plaid prototype crashed into a barrier at the Nürburgring Nordschleife yesterday during testing. While very few details are available, it appears to be the same car our spy photographers spotted at the famous German racetrack exactly one month ago.

Road&Track’s Dale Lomas was the first to report the accident, which wasn’t the only one that occurred on the “Green Hell” on August 26.

“A BMW M8 test-mule crashed heavily on the fast Kesselchen sector, rolling at least once and leveling a large section of barrier. Meanwhile, unconnected but only a few hundred yards up the track, a Tesla Model S Plaid also suffered an impact with the barrier in the Klostertal sector. Both drivers are believed to be in good condition, despite the severity of any Nordschleife crash.”

We don’t know the extent of the damage suffered by the Model S Plaid, but we do know that the Tesla and BMW crashes reportedly messed up GM’s plans to set a lap record with its 2022 Chevy Corvette Z06 prototypes.

Gallery: Tesla Model S Plaid Prototype Spied At The Nürburgring

According to the report, the accidents demanded immediate repair to the barriers, plus extensive clean-up operations. As a result, track conditions may have been compromised in the affected section, making it impossible for the Corvette Z06 to do a fast lap.

Back to the Plaid, Tesla has previously targeted a 7:05 time at the Nordschleife. Back in November 2019, a Model S Plaid prototype with aero parts and other modifications reportedly set a 7:13 lap time, half a minute quicker than the Porsche Taycan. However, we’re talking about an unofficial result that wasn’t homologated. 

The new prototype that was testing until yesterday was spotted last month looking stock, with the exception of a roll cage, sticky Michelin Super Sport tyres, and a regular steering wheel instead of the yoke.

For those who are hoping Tesla will offer a traditional steering wheel as an option, that’s quite unlikely. In the case of the test prototype, the crew opted for a normal steering wheel probably because it makes the car easier to handle in turns at high speeds, and therefore quicker.