F1's current engines are set to be used until the end of the 2024 season before a new power unit is introduced, with the latest summit over proposals taking place in Austria at the beginning of the month.

Existing players Ferrari, Mercedes, Renault and Red Bull were joined by officials from Audi and Porsche for the meeting in the latest sign of the VW Group's interest in taking one of its brands into F1.

The meeting was said to be largely positive, with F1 CEO and president Stefano Domenicali calling it "a good step in the right direction".

Aston Martin's team is powered by Mercedes, but Stroll said he would welcome the arrival of another major manufacturer to the table in F1 to help strengthen the series.

"I would certainly welcome and embrace the entry of the VW Group," Stroll said in a select media roundtable including Motorsport.com. "I just think it would show us the strength of the sport. The stronger groups that are in the sport, the better for everyone involved, whether it be fans, whether it be team owners, whether it be FOM or FIA.

"So I know they're quite engulfed in conversations about returning with one or two of their brands, and I am very excited and supportive of them coming into the sport.

"I think it would be great."

With Honda exiting F1 at the end of the year, officials are eager to try and introduce a power unit that is both cheap and sustainable, with a significance focus set to be place on e-fuels.

Red Bull is set to take over Honda's existing engines as a first step towards producing its own powertrains from 2025, and has called for a "clean sheet" approach to be taken at that date.

Current Williams CEO Jost Capito used to serve as Volkswagen's director of motorsport, and expressed his belief that F1 needed a "significant change" to come in line with the road car industry.

"When you look where the automotive industry is going, the CO2 discussion is an issue," said Capito. "I am absolutely convinced that Formula 1 has to go to zero CO2 as well from 2025, but there are more technical options than just full electric. E-fuels is something that has to be investigated, has to be looked at, and also in combination with hybrid.

"In my view these systems and technology have a future on mobility, and therefore I think the regulations should go in that direction, but should investigate all options.

"Therefore it is right that car manufacturers have to be part of the discussion. They have to be attracted to the new regulations or they wouldn't join."

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