At this point, it has become clear that regardless of what the Tesla Model S Plaid's official zero-to-60-mph time is (with or without rollout), it's essentially impossible to beat when it comes to acceleration. Unless, of course, the competing car has some insane modifications.

Thus far, even obnoxious supercar rivals and heavily modified drag-ready sports cars are no match for Tesla's high-performance flagship family saloon. However, it may have met its match racing this "Beast 69 Camaro" with nitrous, though there's a caveat.

While these Plaid drag racing videos may get old to some folks over time, we continue to share them, but only if there's something unique or worth mentioning. In this case, the YouTube channel points out that the Model S Plaid may be unaffected by its battery state of charge. For those unaware, typically an electric car will begin to lose steam as its battery gets low, and it may not be able to achieve a bunch of passes at a high level of acceleration. However, BORN 2 RACE shares:

"Tesla SOC in the Camaro race under 40%, plaid may not be affected by SOC. We did like 15 passes all of them in low six and over 115 mph."

We remember a time when Tesla sceptics proved that the outgoing Model S couldn't handle repeated launches all day without stopping to cool down and potentially charge up. When the Porsche Taycan came to market, it proved that it could launch over and over and over with no obvious impact on performance, and no chance of becoming inoperable for a time.

While we have nothing to go on here aside from the video footage and the words shared by the YouTube channel, it would make sense that Tesla worked hard to assure that the quickest car in the world also had plenty of endurance.

However, the information here is a bit contradictory. The channel says the Plaid may be unaffected by the state of charge, though it ends up losing to the nitrous Camaro. Would the Model S have won the race if it was fully charged, or was the nitrous Camaro just too quick off the line?