Reportedly, Tesla could have produced a quad-motor Model S Plaid, but it stuck with three motors, at least for now.

Unlike most automakers, there are certain details Tesla no longer officially reveals, such as battery pack size, some future plans, details about motors and efficiency, etc. People covering Tesla have to use the EPA's site, as well as other sources, data, figures, and simulations to come up with estimates about certain specific details and specs related to the brand's cars. 

With that said, as MotorTrend has been working closely with Tesla related to the new Model S Plaid, and it seems to be getting some juicy morsels of information from company sources. According to Electrek, someone at Tesla shared that the new Model S has a 100 kWh battery pack, which, if true, is smaller than the pack in the outgoing 2020 Model S. MotorTrend also just reported that a Tesla company source revealed details about a potential quad-motor car.

Tesla says, in a very obvious Spaceballs reference, "the only thing beyond Ludicrous is Plaid." However, we all know this statement is just temporary. The next-gen Roadster aims to go beyond Plaid, but perhaps Tesla can keep its statement intact by calling the quickest Roadster the "Roadster Plaid." Who knows?

Based on MotorTrend's recent article, it seems there could be a quad-motor Model S Plaid in the future. In fact, the publication claims a source at Tesla said there's no reason the company can't produce a quad-motor Plaid. Perhaps the cancelled Plaid+ had the potential to use four motors? If Tesla did employ four motors in a future Model S, it would clearly have more power and traction than the current Plaid, which would likely lead to quicker acceleration times.

With that said, MotorTrend's claimed anonymous source shared that Tesla didn't need to use four motors for the Model S Plaid. The source also said that while the rear dual-motor unit could also work on the front axle, it would make the frunk smaller and reduce the car's overall efficiency. Not to mention added cost and complexity. Since the Model S Plaid is already the quickest production car ever built, it doesn't really make sense to push it even further at this point.