So much for the demand cliff and Tesla Killer narratives.

According to recent article published by Teslarati, the Tesla Model 3 is now the most popular electric car in the United Kingdom. But what about the often-reported lack of demand and slowing sales related to Tesla's vehicles, or the multitude of "Tesla Killers" swooping in to bankrupt the Silicon Valley automaker?

Don't get us wrong here, the competition is certainly coming, and some current and future Model 3 rivals are quite compelling. Depending on who you talk to, some Tesla rivals are actually better than Tesla's vehicles in a number of ways. In fact, we're increasingly excited that Tesla rivals are finally arriving, and some are fantastic cars.

With that said, just because other automakers are finally moving forward with compelling EVs doesn't mean people will stop buying Tesla's vehicles. It just means many more people will take the plunge and switch to an EV. Some people like Android phones and Samsung products much better than Apple products, but people haven't stopped buying the iPhone, and they probably never will.

Demand for the Model 3 is reportedly massive across the globe. Tesla and Elon Musk continue to say the brand is production-constrained, and that's why it's expanding and improving facilities, all while building multiple global factories. It will be interesting to see – once Tesla is no longer production-constrained – if its deliveries shoot "to the moon" in a big way. If not, the new factories may be excess.

At any rate, based on recent figures provided by independent analyst Matthias Schmidt, the number of Tesla Model 3 saloons in the UK has now passed the Nissan Leaf over the first four months of 2021. The data suggests that there are some 39,900 Model 3 vehicles in the UK compared to 38,900 Leaf hatchbacks.

As of May 2021, some 232,000 EVs had been sold in the UK, which is due in part to a massive increase over the last five years. The fact that the Model 3 is dominating is interesting since there are cheaper EVs available in the UK, and the area doesn't have quite the same charging infrastructure issues and range needs reported in the US.