If you take the necessary precautions, you are sure to get a laugh.

Honda will stop selling combustion-engined vehicles by 2040. Governments worldwide already have a date to make them illegal. You’d expect Australia to be on the same path. However, according to TheJuiceMedia, that’s not what is happening. On the contrary: the Australian government would be making things difficult for EVs. This honest ad would show how in this video: Warning: it is very NSFW, but it is worth watching.

The video starts by saying that, after losing its automotive industry, the country could seize its lithium reserves to get it back, but it decided to flush it down the “dunny.” The video also points out other multiple advantages the electric car industry could bring to Australia. Sadly, the government members would have chosen to say EVs can’t tow a boat, for example.

After showing that is not the case with some footage, the government member played by actress Ellen Burbidge says the country decided to launch FFS. Believe it or not, that’s the acronym for Australia’s Future Fuels Strategy – and that is not satire.

NSFW - Honest Ad Makes Fun Of How Australia Handles EVs

At this point in the video, you’ll see Australien’s Coat of Arms. It was created to warn people it was a joke – which any sane human being could already tell by the language. In September 2017, TheJuiceMedia was asked to stop using the satirical Coat of Arms by the Australian National Symbols Officer. 

Five days later, then-senator George Brandis proposed a Bill to amend the Criminal Code Act 1995 to make it a crime to represent as a Commonwealth entity or service. After a long discussion about censorship and free speech, the Bill passed but excluded “Australians who do this 'solely for genuine satirical, academic or artistic purposes.'” This allowed TheJuiceMedia to continue with its Honest Ads.

This one about EVs continues making fun of FFS because it would not help improve EV adoption. Instead, it would keep Australia dependent on oil and allow other ideas such as charging EV owners with an annual 300 Australian dollar tax. That one would have come from the Victoria State government. TheJuiceMedia urges viewers to help stop that.

We will need the help of our Australian readers to have any idea if the criticism is fair or not. Regardless, it is a good warning about what other governments could be doing to prevent EV adoption. When their own car manufacturers are saying they will stop producing combustion engines, we wonder what these countries will want to buy: used vehicles from markets that no longer want them? Let the discussion begin, FFS!