This means the Clio and Zoe will soldier on alongside, eventually possibly get renewed with all-new versions.

Renault may be all about Renaulution these days, but in dramatically changing its business model (to focus more on electrified vehicles and its past glories), it won’t necessarily ditch any of its established nameplates from modern times.

In other words, even if the French automaker is planning on launching an electric city car inspired by the iconic 5 hatchback, this doesn’t mean it will directly replace the Clio or the Zoe, even though they roughly the same size.

Based on what was said in this article by Autocar, both the Clio and the Zoe will coexist with the new electric 5, even if there will be some overlapping among these models. The article quotes Gilles Vidal, the new design boss at Renault, who said:

Now is the time to challenge what exists at this point. This isn't meant to replace the Clio as such, but there are questions about the Clio and the Captur: what they stand for, what energy source they should use depending on the regulations of each country - and this is changing every month. You need to be able to adapt to whatever happens with your global product strategy and energy solutions. We don't know for sure if this will replace anything, but if you look at the B-segment, there will be maybe too many at some point, so some will disappear. I can't say which at this point.

This is backed up by previous statements made by the Renault Group vice president, Laurens van den Acker, who confirmed the Zoe would continue to be sold. The reasoning behind it is simple, really: it is Europe’s single best selling electric car, and it is wiser to keep the nameplate going than to replace it with something completely new.

The Renault 5-inspired EV is expected to debut in 2023, alongside a rumoured (but not yet confirmed) reinterpreted 4L model. We really wonder if Renault will also keep the Twingo in its range, or if it will be replaced by one of the two aforementioned new models. No mention about it is made in the source article, though, so we can only speculate at this point.