They’re sharing more than just track time.

When BMW refreshes its 3 and 4 Series models, we know what’s next – the high-performance M cars. And that formula isn’t changing yet. Our spy photographers captured the pair – the M3 saloon and M4 Coupe – testing at the Nurburgring before their scheduled reveal this September. That means we’re seeing more of the two models than ever before, even though they continue to wear camouflage wraps.

However, the camouflage can’t hide everything, and we can see the M3 duplicating the M4’s controversial grille design. The two share the massive kidney grille, flanked by thin headlights, and both will feature reworked front fascias. Expect sportier styling for both, which will help improve performance, with the usual tweaks inside, like the M branding. But design is only part of the pair’s appeal. The video above takes viewers along for a ride in the M4 with the head of BMW M development explaining the two new M models. 

Gallery: BMW M3 Spy Photos

It’s what’s under the bonnet that makes the M3 and M4 special, and it appears we’ll have two versions of each. Codenamed the M3 Pure and M4 Pure, the two will serve as the entry-level trim, offering reduced output, a rear-wheel-drive layout, and a manual gearbox. The Pure models are expected to produce 460 bhp (343 kilowatts) from the twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre straight-six S58 engine. The non-Pure models get the same engine, though it makes 480 bhp (357 kW). The 480-bhp M3 and M4 also get the company’s eight-speed automatic and the xDrive all-wheel-drive system.

Gallery: BMW M4 Spy Photos

BMW has already started to tease both models, and we know the reveal is scheduled for September. The M4 convertible could be there, too, though previous rumours suggested a 2021 reveal. Either way, the M3 Pure and M4 Pure models are expected to arrive at dealerships first – in early 2021 – with the full-power models coming late next year. Then we can look out for the M3 and M4 Competition models, which could offer as much as 510 bhp (380 kW) and 480 pound-feet (650 Newton-metres) of torque.

Source: Automedia