The crossover is getting a complete makeover, and heavy camo coverings are already dropping away.

Hyundai just gave its compact Tucson crossover a facelift for the 2019 model year, but we’ve already seen next-generation prototypes testing in public for the last couple of months. Not only that, some of the heavy camouflage is falling away to reveal the crossover’s new Cascading grille and fascia. We captured these details in a series of spy photos last month, and now we have a new spy video showing the forthcoming people mover in action.

We don’t yet have much info on the underpinnings or powertrain, save that it will likely run a new Theta3 engine displacing 2.5 litres, at least on some markets. We’ve heard it will send power to either the front wheels or all four through an eight-speed automatic, and a hybrid variant is likely to show up as well. This video doesn’t offer any details on the powertrain, though we do get a chance to sort-of see it off-road when the driver spots our spy team on the road and performs a quick 180. Admittedly it's not much to see, but you know, it confirms the next-gen Tucson has functioning suspension and the ability to turn. When will this incredible parade of advanced technology ever stop?

Gallery: 2021 Hyundai Tucson newest spy photos

What the video does show – at the beginning anyway – is a passenger in the second-row seat. That alone isn’t significant, but when viewed in profile, it sure looks like there could be room for a third row. The current model accommodates five people, and despite the very limited legroom often accompanied by an extra row in a compact SUV, it’s become something of a trend in the market. We’ve heard rumours that the option might only be offered in select areas as India, where it would replace the larger Santa Fe. Regardless of the seating, the new Tucson should have a completely new greenhouse Hyundai’s latest tech.

We’re still working on a 2021-model-year timeframe for the next-gen Tucson, which likely means an official debut taking place later next year. Nothing is confirmed at this point, but with heavy camo already dropping away in the front, it’s a reliable estimate to work with.

Source: Automedia