Here's something you don't see every day – an alligator behind the wheel of a '68 Corvette.

Just about every single day, the Motor1.com staff goes deep into the Internet database in search of interesting renderings to share with our audience. While some of these digital exercises offer a potential view into the future of actual production cars, others are purely just for fun to put a smile on your face. Today, we have something a bit different to share, courtesy of talented Swiss artist Frédéric Müller and his interesting “Rides of the Wild” collection.

1968 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray for alligator
'

What’s this all about? He had the rather unconventional idea of fusing classic cars with animals and came up with four double renders of various vehicles morphing into means of transportation for animals. Our favourite of the set would have to be the 1968 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray fit for an alligator, hence the “G4T0R” license plate. Its deep emerald colour matches that of the “driver” having fun behind the wheel.

1977 Fiat 600S for panda bear
1977 Fiat 600S for panda bear

There’s also a cute 1977 Fiat 600S modified for a panda bear. This one too carries a personalised license plate – P4ND4 – and gets a black and white theme to mimic the bear’s fur. Its front grille has been redesigned to resemble the panda bear’s nose, while the roof holds a pair of “ears” to further bridge the connection between the two. There’s also a roof rack made from bamboo – a favourite dish for a panda bear.

1963 Aston Martin DB5 for hippopotamus
1963 Aston Martin DB5 for hippopotamus

Up next is perhaps the quirkiest rendering of the set – a 1963 Aston Martin DB5 with the headlights pushed towards the corners of the car in a bid to replicate the face and eyes of a hippopotamus. Like the Panda above, this one too has received a set of ears on the roof and has a custom license plate reflecting its theme: “H1PP0.”

1967 Ford F-250 for lion
1967 Ford F-250 for lion

Last but certainly not least, it’s a camper-hauling 1967 Ford F-250 suitable for a lion. Gone is the “FORD” lettering at the front as it’s been replaced by “ROAR,” while the standard grille has been updated with a new design inspired by a lion’s nose. The paint and “ears” are also nods to the king of the jungle, as is the “L10N” license plate.

Thinking outside the box, Frédéric Müller explains his desire is to “create pieces that viewers can lose themselves in, look at for longer than just a couple seconds, and jump-start their own imaginations. I am always looking to create something that is a bit special, that hasn’t been thought of before, or that has a special vibe to it.”

If you like any of these wild renders, they’re available as art prints through the M.A.D. Gallerysee the second source link below.