The Americans are a bit upset about the name.

The original Mitsubishi Eclipse was a two-door coupe and convertible that was popular in North America but never sold here in Europe. Our colleagues in the States tell us that fans of the now-iconic Japanese runabout have begged for a return to the turbocharged engine and all-wheel drive format that made this car a legend in the 1990s. While we’d love to say your prayers have been answered, in this case, be careful what you wish for seems a bit more appropriate.

Now that we’ve addressed the elephant in the room, it’s time to consider Mitsubishi’s new coupe-SUV crossover on its own merits. Slotting between the Outlander and ASX, the Eclipse Cross does have a rather distinctive look with its flared haunches, sloping roof, and sharply angled beltline that culminates with a steeply raked rear window. There’s no mistaking the massive grille and driving lamps up front; in back a mid-mount LED stop light bar runs between the LED tail lamps, merging with them in a manner that clearly resembles the arching sky-high spoiler from the late-1990s Eclipse coupe.

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross
Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

 

Inside, the Eclipse Cross gets all kinds of buttons and technology, wrapped in a monotone-themed cockpit that should offer comfortable seating for five adults. Rear seats have a 60:40 split with slide-and-recline adjustments, allowing rear passengers to adjust seating position for better headroom despite the sloping roof. The on-board Smartphone Link Display supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, allowing users to link and interface with the devices via voice command or touchpad controller. There’s also a heads-up display for the driver, a feature that adds cool-factor to any vehicle.

 

Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross
Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross

 

Power comes from a pair of turbocharged engine options – a new 1.5-litre petrol engine mated to a CVT, or a 2.2-litre common rail diesel that connects to an eight-speed automatic. Mitsubishi hasn’t published details on horsepower, but in a press release the manufacturer says both offer a “brisk driving experience.” Regardless of the mill, an electronically controlled all-wheel drive system funnels power to where it can do the most good. The system incorporates brake-activated Active Yaw Control, though its primary goal is to keep things in check as opposed to encouraging all-wheel drive powerslides.

It's obvious Mitsubishi is gunning for the Qashqai with its new model, and first impressions suggest it could prove to be a genuine competitor for the popular Nissan. Deliveries will start in the UK around autumn 2017.

Source: Mitsubishi

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